Study Shows Which Areas of California Have Increased Water Consumption During Drought

A recent survey by the State Water Resources Control board shows how the state’s historic drought has affected Californians’ water consumption. To put it bluntly: it hasn’t. The study compared last May’s numbers with average water consumption from May of 2011-2013 and found that statewide, usage has increased by 1% overall.

The study makes it easy to see who the culprits are in this troubling water usage increase, as it outlines how much each area of the state has increased or decreased this year. For anyone looking to point fingers, it is evident that the South Coast area, which includes Los Angeles County, Riverside County, and San Diego County, is the worst offender. The study reveals that the South Coast’s water usage has gone up a whopping 8%. 

Additionally, the North Lahontan hydrologic region, which makes up a northeastern slice of the state, has increased by 5%. 

Every other region in the state saw a decrease in water usage. The Sacramento River region cut back on water consumption the most, with its numbers falling by 13%. The North Coast wasn’t much farther behind, with a consumption decrease of 12%. 

Many counties have already instituted water conservation measures in order to make sure water reserves are able to last through the dry season; the South Coast region may have to take even more drastic measures in order to keep their consumption from getting out of hand. 

Read more about California’s water consumption here.


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